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scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Vol. 34 February 8, 1937 No. 6 



NOTICE. . . . . . 

During the next few days you will 
receive the second issue of "Foreign Agriculture." 
If you wish to receive this review regularly but 
have not completed and returned the form mailed to 
all domestic subscribers on January 11, please do 
so at once. Otherwise your name will not be 
placed on the mailing list. 



70 



Foreign Crops and luarkets 



Vol. 34, No. 6 



BREAD GEAIN3 

Chinese crop conditions 

The condition of the 1937 wheat crop of China improved during re- 
cent months, according to a radiogram from the Shanghai office of the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Hains, together with rather mild tem- 
peratures, were beneficial to the crop of the Yangtze Valley, and snow 
helped prospects in North China. Sowings were continued throughout 
December in the lower Yangtze Valley, where the total wheat acreage ; 
is reported as about average. In the upper Yangtze Valley and in North 
China, however, sowings were curtailed by drought conditions, and the 
outturn from these reduced areas is not expected to equal that of 1936 
even if growing conditions should be ideal during the remainder of the 
season. 

T he Shanghai wheat market 

Prices of wheat and flour at Shanghai, with the exception of spot 
and January futures, were firm during the week ended January 29, in spite 
of continued declines in world markets. Little interest was shown in for- 
eign purchases, but one partial cargo of Australian wheat was booked for 
immediate shipment. This was obtained at a. price below nominal quota- 
tions, because shipment was arranged for at materially reduced freight 
rates. Arrivals of domestic wheat continued small, but the Shanghai 
mills were still operating at 50-percent capacity. Flour demand had im- 
proved, particularly from North China, and flour stocks declined during 
the week. 

The best quality of spot domestic wheat declined from 100.4-8 cents 
per bushel quoted during the previous week to 97.17 cents in the week 
ended January 29, and Australian from 124.28 to 118.99 cents per bushel. 
Sutures on January 25 ranged from 97,84 cents for January delivery to 
103.52 cents per bushel for April delivery. New-crop wheat for June 
delivery was quoted at 83.82 cents per bushel. Spot flour was practical- 
ly unchanged from the preceding week at 114.58 cents per bag of 49 
pounds. The February futures price on January 29 was 114.29 cents and 
the April quotation 116.64 cents per bag. Australian flour, c.i.f. Hong 
Kong, declined from $4.97 per barrel of 196 pounds, quoted for the week 
ended January 22, to $4.70 per ba.rrel for the week ended January 29. Yfheat 
imports into China during December were negligible. Flour imports for 
the month totaled 19,500 barrels as against 29,000 barrels in December 
1935. Australia and Canada supplied over 75 percent of the December 
shipments both in 1936 and 1935. 



February S, I937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



71 



SUGAR 



The 1957 Sugar Crop in Cuba 

On December 30, 193 6, the Cuban Sugar Stabilization Institute an- 
nounced its recommendations to the President of Cuba pertaining to the 
amount of sugar to be produced in the country during the 1^3 7 sugar cam- 
paign, as reported by H. Freeman Matthews, First Secretary of the United 
States Embassy at Habana. The Institute recommended that a total crop 
of 3)338,217 short tons be produced in 1937* H" 16 proposed figure com- 
pares with 2,899,002 tons produced in 193 6 and an average of 5)221,000 
tons for the years 1925-1929 • The basis for the 1937 recommendation 
rests on the probable exports and local consumption requirements during 
the year. These requirements are estimated as follows: 

P roduction for Short tons percentage 

of total 

(a) Export to United States (to 

fill initial quota for 1337) 1,552,000 46.5 

(b) Export to United States 

(retained for possible 

increases m quota) 568,000 17.0 

(c) Export to other countries 1,048,217 31*4 

(d) Local consumption 170,000 5.._1 

Total 3,338,217 100.0 

At the close of 1936, stocks of sugar retained from production 
in previous years for export to the United States were estimated to be 
370,891 short tons. To these stocks is added a sufficient amount of 
production in 1937 to make up the total initial quota for export to the 
United States of 1,922,423 tons. In 193 6 this quota totaled' 2,085,022 
tons. Similarly, stocks of sugar retained from previous years' crops 
for export to other foreign countries totaled 8,435 tons at the end of 
1936, which together with the estimated production of these sugars in 
1337 makes a total of 1,056,836 tons. 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 



Fruit included under marketing act of Br i tish Columbia 

The Provincial Marketing Act, which was amended by the Legislature 
of British Columbia, Canada, at its last session to govern the opera- 
tions of the fruit industry of the Okanogan Valley, was approved by the 
Government of British Columbia on January 19, 1937, according to Vice 
Consul Nelson P. Meeks at Vancouver, British Columbia. Under tnis leg- 
islation the Tree Fruit Board will have power to control fruit during 
transportation and warehousing, as well as the power to compel central 
control of all selling. All shippers are to be agents of the central 
agency and thus must sell as the Board decides. 



72 

/ 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. b 



Failure to observe the orders of the Board in this new plan for 
central control of selling will make growers and shippers liable to the 
penalties of the Marketing Act. Under this act offenses may be punished 
by fines ranging from $25 to $500, or by jail sentences up to 3 months. 

LIVESTOCK, MEATS , AND WOOL 

German livestock numbers increase 

All classes of livestock in Germany increased noticeably during 
1936, according to the census figures of December 3i 1936, as cabled by 
the Berlin office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Total cattle 
numbers at 20,0o5,000 represent a gain of more than 1,000,000 head, or 9 
percent, since December 1935* The largest increases are shown in the 
groups of animal's less than 2 years old. There is also an increase of 
some 17b,000 cows indicated. Hog numbers in Germany stand at the record 
post-war figure for December of 25,752,000 head, more than 3,000,000 higher 
than in December 1935* The increase registered over comparable figures 
for that year is common to all classes and age groups with th*s exception 
of sows in farrow. The total number of this class is approximately the 
same as it was in December 1935» with 24 percent of the total falling in 
the 6-months-t o-l-year group as against 26 percent the preceding year. 

For the information formerly ' carried in "World Hog and Pork 
Prospects" on the indices of hog and pork supplies, demand, and prices 
in Germany and other foreign markets, see tables on pages 73 and ~]k. 
These tables will henceforth be 'carried monthly in "Foreign Crops and 
Markets." . ' ' 



GEPaMANY: Livestock numbers, December 1932-1936 





Cattle 


Moss 








Year 


Cows 


Total 


Sows 


Under 6 
months 


Total 


Horses ' 


Sheep 


Goats 




Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


1932 a/.. 

1933 a/.. 

1934 a/.. 

1935 b/.. 

1936 c/.. 


sands 
10,825 
11,202 
11,091 
10,052 
. 10,228 


sands 
19,139 
19,739 
19,19S 
18,918 
20,065 


sands 
1,369 
2,015 
1,781 

1,951 
2,029 


sands 
14,718 

15,479 
14, 564 
14,274 
16,073 


sands 
22,859 
23,890 
23,170 
22,722 
25,752 


sands 

3,395 

3,397 

3,360 

3,388 

3,407 


sands 

3,405 

3,387 

3,483 

3,923 

4,331 


sands 

•2,503 

2.5SS 

2,494 

2,501 

2,630 



Deutscher Peichsanzeiger and cables from Berlin office, Bureau of Agricul- 
tural Economics. 

a/ Excluding the Saar. b/ Including Saar except for hogs, c/ Preliminary; 
including Saar except for hogs. 



February 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



United States cattle imports 

Total imports of dutiable cattle into the United States in 1936, 
at 399,209 head, were 34,586 head larger than the 1935 imports. All of 
the increase was accounted for by larger imports of cattle weighing 700 
pounds or more from Canada. About 94 percent of the imports of cattle 
weighing 700 pounds or more in 1936 were accounted for by the low-duty 
quota on that class of cattle granted to Canada in the trade agreement 
with that country. Preliminary figures indicate that that quota was 
filled by December 1 and that Canada supplied about 86.4 percent of the 
quota and Mexico nearly 13.6 percent. 



CATTLE : 


Imports 


into the 


United States by countries 


and weight 


classes, 








1935 and 


1936 










700 -pounds or' 


over 


Under 700 pounds . 


Total 
dutiable 


Year 


Dairy 
cows 


• Other : 


Total 


Under 175 
pounds 


■175—599 
pounds 


Total ; 


1935 


Number 


- Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 1 


Number 


Canada. 




a/ 


59,, 930 


a/ 




52,790 r 


112,720 


Mexico . 


a/ 


a/ 


8,622 


a/ 


a/ 


242,468 \ 


251,090 


Total. . 


a/ 


a/ 


68 , 573 


a/ 


a/ 


296,050 1 


364, 623 


1936 
















Canada. 


6, 686 


136, 533 


143,219 


55,695 


35,149 


90,844 \ 


234,063 


Mexico . 


0 


21,992 


21,992 


1 , 615 


140.439 


142,054 ; 


164,046 


Total . . 


6, 689 


158, 847 


165 ,536 


57,206 


176,467 


233, 673 


399,209 



a/ Not classified prior to 'January 1, 1936. 



HOGS AND POKK PRODUCTS: Average price per 100 pounds in specified markets, 
Decem ber 193 6 with c omparisons 



Hogs , Chicago, basis 
packers 1 and shippers' 

quotations 

Corn, Chicago, 

No. 3 Yellow 

Hogs, heavy, Berlin , live 

weight 

Barley , Leipzig. 
Lard - Chicago. . 

Liverpool 
Hamburg 



C ured po rk , Liverpool - 
American short cut 

green hams . . .' 

American green bellies. 
Danish Wiltshire sides. 
.Canadian _green sides. . . 



1909-1913 1925-1929 



i_ aver age 
Dollars 



a/ Not available . 



average 



Dollar: 



Dec . 

1935 



Dollars 



7.50 


9.76, : 


9.57 


, 9-48 . 


9.96 


.98 


1 .46 


1.05 


1.87 


1.91 


11.63 


15.73 


17.70 


17.70 


17.70 


1.70 


2.27 


3.18 


a/ 


3.19 


10.71 


14.00 . 


13.62 


12.66 


13 . 65 


12.10 


13.89 


15.05 


13.79 


15.26 


11.92 


14 . 54 


14.39. 


13.43 


14.66 


14.30 


. . .2,5 .16 - ■ 


20.28 


. 20 . 50 


20.50 




21.27 


Nominal 


17.98 


18.18 


14.10 


! S3 . 07 


18.09 


19.82 


. 19.99 


13.34 


■ 20.97 


1 15.34 


i 17.69 


17.77 



Nov. 

1936 



Dollars 



Dollars 



74 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 5 



HOGS AND ?GRK PRODUCTS: Indices of foreign supplies and demand 
October-December, 1933-34 to 1936-37 



Country and item 



UNITED KINGDOM: 



fresh pork, London 


pounds 




19,897 


23,399 


24, 145 


28,300 


25,095 


imoorts - 
















Bacon - 
















Denmark ......... 


ii 


59,816 


123,760 


129,292 


111, 771 


100, 113 


88,424 


Irish Free State. 


n 




17,921 


8,833 


13,468 


15,252 


16,270 


United States .... 


ii 


44 , 343 


23,451 


1,910 


1,225 


600 


520 




n 


8,930 


21,557 


19,834 


23,739 


22,489 


39.559 




n 


11,247 


38, 198 


71, 132 


50,029 


45,238 


43,777 


Total 


ii 


124,336 


224,887 


231,001 


200 , 232 


183, 691 


188,550 




ii 


20,474 


28,045 


21,079 


17,257 


17,266 


17,394 




ii 


57,050 


57,495 


74,563 


66,879 


34,957 


41,301 



CANADA : 
Slaughter 



Hogs, inspected 
GEM ANY : 
Pro duction - 
Hog receipts 

14 cities 

Hog slaughter 

36 centers . . . . 
Imports - 
Sacon, total . . . 
Lard, total . • . . 
UNITED STATES : 
Slaughter - 

Hogs, inspected. 
Exports - 
3acon - 
United Kingdom 
Germany* •••••• 

Cuba 

Total. ...... 

Hams , shoulders 
United Kingdom 

Total 

Lard - 
United Kingdom 

Germany 

Cuba 

Netherlands . . . 

Total 



Unit 



1000 ' s 
ii 



O ctober - December 



1909-10 

to 
1913-14 



1924-25 
to 

1928-29 



avera ge averaaS 



450 



34,485 
8 , 857 
3,37o 



738 



43,221 
20,237 
10,313 



1933-34 



765 



'• II 




812 


770 


870 


396 


901 


II 


1,111 


1,010 


1,057 


1,174 


549 


1,206 


j 1000 












a/ 


• pounds 


868 


5,932 


8,500 


10, 343 


6,581 


ii 


54,037 


51, 197 


39, 707 


16, 635 


27, 733 


- M 


i iooo 's 


8, 806 


12 , 538 


12,089 


11,765 


7,432 


12,465 


: iooo 














: pounds 


32,530 


14, 570 


714 


643 


. 280 


282 


: ii 


729 


2,698 


1,415 


0 


0 


0 


; n 


1,833 


5, 505 


941 


1,294 


219 


205 


ii 


45,196 


33,236 


7,144 


2,578 


718 


834 


! it 


30,316 


30,981 


14,910 


11, 138 


9, 632 


5,948 


ii 


35,684 


37,975 


17,654 


14,349 


11,373 


8,274 


ii 


39,297 


51,563 


75, 683 


46, 667 


13, 599 


15,887 



33, 625 
2, 757 
1 1 , *i55 



1934-35 



782 



1,828 
8, 767 
9 



1935-36 



788 



860 
•,527 
0 



1936-37 



1,214 



1,036 
8, 632 

•0 



112,662! 174,048. 152, 153 : 62,779 : 18,516;' 20,401 



a/ Not yet avei lable • 



February 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



75 



WHEAT, INCLUDING- FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given b y current tr ad e sou rces. 19 34-35 to 1936-37 



Total Shipments 1937 . Shipments 

Country ; shi pments \ week ended : july 1 - Jan .30 

; 19 34- 35 '■ 19 35- 3~6 :' J an . 16 'Jan ." " 23 "J an . 30 1 19 35- 3 6 j 193 6- 37 

" : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 j 1,000 \ 1,000 : 1,000 ; 1,000 
; bushels : bushels'; b ushels I b ushels ' bushels : bushel s ; bushels 

North America a/ ; 162, 832 \ 219, 688 j 2,720: 3,162' 2,402 j 111, 776- 159,106 

Canada, 4 markets b/. .. ;176,059 : ' 246,199: 1,398! 1,121; 661 j 172, 942; 159 ,080 

United States c/ \ 2 1,532: 15 , 930: 6]J 48 : 118; 4,393: 5,487 

Argentina '186,228: 77,384" 5,740; 7,695! 7,4771 54, 288 : 60,096 

Australia : 111, 628 ! 110, 060 i 1,720.: 3, 741. | 3,535: 56,552! 47,316 

Russia '. : 1,672! 30,224i 0: 0; • 0: 25,616! 88 

Danube and Bulgaria d/. ! 4,104! 8,216; 1,392: 976: 496: 7,752| 44,856 

British India j c/2, 318! c/2,52 9; 0; 528; 16; 256! 7,60 8 

Total e/ : 4 68, 78 2: 4 43,161^ J I ! 256,240 . 319,07 0 

Total European ship- ; j < :f/ : fj 

ments a/ ~. ! 387, 752! 3 55,032: 10,560: j : 189 , 856j 231 , 696 

Total ex-European ship- i > ; : • —i 

ments a/ 147, 938 ' 133, 528 : 1,720 ; : 70,928 : 73,320 



Compiled from official and trade sources. a7~Broomhall ' s Corn Trade News, 
b/ Eort William, port Arthur, Vancouver, Drince Rupert, and New Westminster. 
c_l Official. Accumulations are not complete data for United States, but repre- 
sent totals for 16 principal ports only, d/ Black Sea shipments only. e-/ Total 
of trade figures includes North America as reported by Broomhall. f/ To January 
16. 



INDIA: Wheat acreage and yield per acre, 1932-33 to 1937-38 



Crop 
year 


First 
estimate 


Final 
estimate 


Yield per 
acre 








1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


Bushels 


1932-33. 






33,078 


33,803 


10.0 


1933-34. 






31,831 


32,976 


10.7 


1934-35. 






34,286 


35,992 


9.8 


1935-36. 






33,168 


34,491 


10.5 


1936-37 . 






32,760 


33,631 


10.5 


1937-38. 






32,167 







Indian Department of Statistics, Calcutta. 



/6 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. ]>k, No. 6 



WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of May futures 



Date 


Chicago 


Kansas City 


Minneapolis 


Winnipeg a/ 


Liverpool a 


1 Buenos 
Aires b/ 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


High of. . 
Low 0/ . . . 
Jan , 9 . . . 

16. .. 

23... 

30... 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Centa 


103 
100 
101 
101 
102 
100 


13 6 
126 
13 k 
133 
128 
128 


102 

97 
100 
100 
100 

99 


129 
120 
128 
126 
121 
121 


112 
108 
108 
110 
110 
109 


132 
lk2 
iko 
135 
13 if 


89 

S7 
88 

89 
88 
87 


129 
118 
129 
125 
121 
120 


96 
92 

95 
96 
3 k 
Sk 


133 
119 
131 
128 

123 
122 


d/ 9^ 
a/ 91 
a/ 93 
a/ 92 
a/ 92 
a/ 92 


e/100 
e/ 9^ 

a/ 9S 
a/ 9S 
96 
91+ 



a/ Conversions at noon "buying rate of exchange, b/ Prices are of day previous to 
other prices, c/ January 1 to date, d/ March futures, e/ March and May futures. 



WHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 





; All classes No. 


2 


No. 


1 


}lo. 2 


Hard 


No 


0 


Western 


Week 


■ and § 


:rades Hard Winter 


Dk.N.S 


prihg_ 


Amber Durum 


Red Winter 


White 


ended 


• six markets! Kansas Citv 


Minneapolis 


Minneapolis 


St. Louis 


Seattle a 




1936 


1937! 193 6 


1937 


193 6 


1937 


1936 


1937 


193 b 


1937 


193- 


19^7 




Cents 


Cent s • Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


High b/ . . 


108 


150 : 118 


lk3 


135 


176 


122 


180 


111 


lk5 


90 


115 


Low b/ . . . 


106 


136 ■ 111 


135 


127 


158 


115 


16k 


106 


137 


88 


112 


Jan . 9 • • • 


108 


150 : 115 


lkl 


130 


167 


122 


180 


111 


1*0 


90 


Ilk 


16... 


105 


lkS • 112 


iko 


132 


166 


120 


168 


107 


lkl 


88 


11k 


23.. 


106 


iki ; 111 


136 


133 


158 


115 


l6H 


108 


138 


88 


112 


30... 


' 107 


136 : ill 


135 


127 




120 


172 


106 


137 


88 





a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis No. 1 sacked, b/ January 1 to 
date . 



WHEAT: Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1935-3 6 and 1936-37 



Rotterda m 



Year 




Hard 








Berlin 


Paris 


ana 


beginning 


Range 


Winter 


Manitoba 


Argentina 


Australia 


cj _ _ 




Wales 


July 




No. 2 


No. 3 


§J. 


b/ 


! Domestic 






Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


1935-36 a/ 


High 


103 


10k 


38 


95 


229 




81 




Low 


7^ 


82 


63 


71 


209 


121 


59 


1936-37 a/ 


High 


130 


Iks 


127 


ikz 


233 


20k 


117 


Dec. 2k 


Low 


101 


99 


99 


100 


209 


179 


91 




e/ 127 


139 


123 


ikz 


223 




120 


31 




e/ 130 


Iks 


127 


1U2 


223 




125 


Jan. 7 
















128 


lU 
















130 



.Englana 



Prices at Paris are of day previous to other prices. Prices in England and Wales 
are for week ending Saturday. Conversions made at current exchange rates, 
a/ Barusso. b/ F.A.Q. c/ Producer's fixed price frra August lb, 193^» §■/ < Tu -ly 
1 to date. _e/ Nominal. 



February 8, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



77 



FEED GRAINS AND EYE: Weekly average price per "bushel of corn, rye, 
oats, and barley at leading markets a/ 





Corn 


Bye 


Oats 


Barley 




Chicago 


Buenos Aires 


Minneapolis 


, Chicago 


Minneapolis 


Week 
ended 


No. 3 

Yellow 


Futures 


Futures 


N 0 • 


o 
<o 


No. 3 

White 


MO . 


p 




1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


;1937 


1936 


1937 


High b / . . . . 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


•Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


61 


113 


61 


111 


39 


51 


55 


117 


31 


: 55 


71 


136 


Low b/. .... 


60 


108 


60 
May 


105 
May 


37 
Feb. 


1 49 • 
Feb. 


53 


110 


30 


: 52 


60 


129 


• "Jan. 3, . . 


61 


108 


1 61 


105 


39 


50 


53 


117 


31 


: 53 


64 


130 


• 9. . . 




112 


61 


110 


38 


49 


53 


116 


31 


: 55 


60 


, 129 


16... . 




112 


60 


111 


38 


50 


53 


113 


30 


■ 55 


71 


; 128 


23 




113 


60 


110 


37 


51 


54 


110 


30 


j 53 


67 


: 136 


30 


60 


113 


60 


103 


'38 


51 


55 


111 


30 


: 52 


68 


131 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations, b/ For , period January 1 to latest date shown. 

FEEL CHAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries. 



Commodity 
and 



Exports 
for yea.r 



Shipments 
Week ended a/ 



coantry 


1934-35 


1935-36 


Jan. 16 


Jan. 23 


Jan. 30 


July 1 
to 


1935-36 


1936-37 

w 


BARLEY, EXPORTS: c, 
United States. . . 

Danube & U. S.S.R 


1,000 
''bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1 , 000 ' 
bushels 


ijooo 

bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


Jan. 30 
Dec. 31 
Jan. 15 
Jan. 30 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


4,050 
14 , 453 
20,739 
11,250 


9,886 
6,882 
9,468 
37,375 


0 

325 
305 


0 

281 


0 
74 


7,231 
4,334 
1,850 
37,378 


3,938 
16,388 

4,450 
21,676 


50,492 


63,611 










50,793 


46,452 


OATS, EXPORTS: c/ 
United States , . . 

Danube & U. S.S.R. 
Total 


1,147 

17,407 
43,753 
,8.444 


1,429 
14,892 
9,790 
2.847 


0 

296 
0 


0 

1,130 
10 


0 

675 
1 


Jan. 30 
Dec. 31 
Jan. 30 
Jaftt 3Q 


604 
9,877 
6,548 
1.390 


378 
6,679 
9,736 

810 


70.751 


28.958 










18,419 


17 , 603 


COW, EXPORTS: d/ 
United States . . . 
Danube & U. S. S.R 

Argentina 

South Africa. . . . 
Total 


880 
14,939 
'256,143 
21.882 


835 
14,984 
307,362 
8.910 


2 

638 
8,918 
26, 


1 2 
408 
' 9,158 
; 43 


0 

340 
10,492 


Nov . 1 to 
Jan. 30 
Jan. 30 
Jan. 30 
Jan . 23 


55 
2,725. 
79 , 547 
4,871 


28 
6,947 
112,720 
2,354 


293,8 44 


332,141 










87,298 


122,049 


United States 
imports. 


41,111 


. 24,521 








Dec. 31 


2,092 


4,430 



Exports as far 
as reported 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ The weeks shown 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary, c/ Year beginning 
beginning November 1. 



in these columns are 
July 1. d/ Year 



78 



foreign Croos and Markets Vol. -.34* Ho. 6 



Index 



Page 

Barley, prices, Leipzig, Ger many, 

December 1936. 73 

Cattle, imports, U.S., 1935 , 1936. ... 73 

Corn, prices, Chicago, December 1937 73 
Fruit, Government control, British 

Columbia, Canada, Jan. 19, 1937... 71 



Grains (feed) ; 

Movement, principal countries, 

Jan.; 30," 1937.". 77 

Prices, orinci-oal markets,. 

Jan. 30, 1937 77 

Hogs: 

prices, specified markets, 

December 1936 " 73 

Slaugnter, specified countries, 

December 1936 74 

Lard: 

Exports, U.S., December 1936 74 

Imports, U.K., December 1936...... 74 

Prices, specified markets, 

December 1936.... 73 



Page 



Livestock, numbers, Germany, Y: 

1932-1936 ,72 

Pork: 

•Exports, U.S., December 1936 74 

Imports, U.K., December 1936 1'A 

Prices, U,K., December 1936 73 

Supplies, U.K., December 1936 74 

Rye, prices, U.S., Jan. 30, 1937.... 77 

Sugar, production, Cuba, 1937 71 

Wheat: ... 

Area, India, 1932-1937 75 

Crop condition (winter), China, 

January 1937 70 

Market' conditions, China, 

Jan. 29, 1937 70 

Prices: 

Shanghai, Jan. 29, 1937 70 

Specified markets, Jan. 30, 1937 76 
Shipments, principal countries, 

Jan. 30, 1937. ...... 75 

' Yield per acre, India, 1932-1936.. 75